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  1. B. S. Maccabee, Appl. Opt. 18, 2527 (1979).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. W. Ireland, M. K. Andrews, Appl. Opt. 18, 3889 (1979).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. B. S. Maccabee, “What Really Happened in New Zealand,” privately circulated (1979).
  4. W. Ireland, “Unfamiliar Observations of Lights in the Night Sky,” Physics and Engineering Laboratory Report 659, Dept. of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt, New Zealand.
  5. These are magnetic compass readings; the magnetic declination is 22° east.
  6. The first change corrects a mistake on the part of this investigator: the radar did not require 3 min to warm up after it was turned on because it was already in a warmed-up standby condition, a fact of which I was unaware until after publication of Refs. 1 and 3. The second change results from actual measurements of the radar sweep range. Previously the value had been only estimated.
  7. The angular extent of the radar blip reported by the captain was unusually large. Experiments with the same aircraft radar indicate that it can just barely detect individual fishing boats beyond 20 km or so. The associated blips look like small dots on the screen.
  8. This research has been supported in part by the Fund for UFO Research, Box 277, Mt. Rainier, Maryland 20822.

1979 (3)

Andrews, M. K.

Ireland, W.

W. Ireland, M. K. Andrews, Appl. Opt. 18, 3889 (1979).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

W. Ireland, “Unfamiliar Observations of Lights in the Night Sky,” Physics and Engineering Laboratory Report 659, Dept. of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt, New Zealand.

Maccabee, B. S.

B. S. Maccabee, Appl. Opt. 18, 2527 (1979).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

B. S. Maccabee, “What Really Happened in New Zealand,” privately circulated (1979).

Appl. Opt. (2)

privately circulated (1)

B. S. Maccabee, “What Really Happened in New Zealand,” privately circulated (1979).

Other (5)

W. Ireland, “Unfamiliar Observations of Lights in the Night Sky,” Physics and Engineering Laboratory Report 659, Dept. of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt, New Zealand.

These are magnetic compass readings; the magnetic declination is 22° east.

The first change corrects a mistake on the part of this investigator: the radar did not require 3 min to warm up after it was turned on because it was already in a warmed-up standby condition, a fact of which I was unaware until after publication of Refs. 1 and 3. The second change results from actual measurements of the radar sweep range. Previously the value had been only estimated.

The angular extent of the radar blip reported by the captain was unusually large. Experiments with the same aircraft radar indicate that it can just barely detect individual fishing boats beyond 20 km or so. The associated blips look like small dots on the screen.

This research has been supported in part by the Fund for UFO Research, Box 277, Mt. Rainier, Maryland 20822.

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Figures (1)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Approximate flight path of aircraft. Sector A indicates uncertainties in the remembered radar distance and radar/visual azimuth angle when the object was first seen. The vertical arrows through sector B indicate an added uncertainty in the time at which the radar target went off the scope, here estimated to be 5 min after the first sighting. Line C indicates the position of the plane and azimuth of the object as recorded by the Wellington Air Traffic Control Center at 2:27 a.m. Sighting lines D to E are estimates based on witness statements. Associated with these azimuths are depression angles in the range 20–40°, with the depression angle at E being ∼45°. The square area at E represents the estimated location of the object when last seen.

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