Abstract

This year marks the 100th anniversary of Edison’s invention of the electric lamp, one of many heralded accomplishments that brought him lasting fame. For much of life Edison enjoyed a popular reputation as a laboratory genius who personified the spirit of scientific discovery. Was he really a scientist, or only an inventor? His participation in the Draper Expedition to the solar eclipse of 1878, told here, offers a chance to evaluate the youthful Edison as an astronomer and infrared physicist.

© 1979 Optical Society of America

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Scientists and Engineers

Erik Ingelstam
Appl. Opt. 1(3) 191-192 (1962)

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