Abstract

A study of the limitations of optoacoustic detection of ethylene in gas mixtures using a 12C16O2 laser is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the detection of ethylene in urban areas and in fruit storage chambers. Calculations indicate that in most cases of interest the practical minimum detectable and identifiable concentration of ethylene is about 5 ppb. A concentration of 1% of CO2 may increase this limit to 50 ppb. These limits are primarily due to inaccuracy in a priori knowledge of ir spectral signatures of interfering gases. As a practical example of the monitoring of ethylene in a realistic environment, a meausrement with a sensitive resonant optoacoustic cell in an urban area is reported. The same cell is also used to demonstrate the effectiveness of NaOH scrubbers for the elimination of interfering CO2. Measurements of absorption coefficients of ethylene for several 12C16O2 laser transitions are reported and compared with those given in the literature. Data are also given for the isotopic 13C16O2 laser transitions which may be useful in overcoming CO2 interference.

© 1979 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
More Like This
Real-time trace-level detection of carbon dioxide and ethylene in car exhaust gases

Michael T. McCulloch, Nigel Langford, and Geoffrey Duxbury
Appl. Opt. 44(14) 2887-2894 (2005)

Resonant optoacoustic cells for trace gas analysis*

E. Kritchman, S. Shtrikman, and M. Slatkine
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68(9) 1257-1271 (1978)

Remote measurement of ethylene using a CO2 differential-absorption lidar

E. R. Murray and J. E. van der Laan
Appl. Opt. 17(5) 814-817 (1978)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription

Figures (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription

Tables (8)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription

Equations (12)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription