Abstract

This condensation—extracts from a book of the same title by a consultant on reflector design—should enable the graduate engineer to design a simple reflector to produce a circular, linear, or rectangular light beam. This is the second of three parts appearing in the Optical Activities in Industry column of Applied Optics. Part 1 was published in the 1 March issue.

© 1978 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. References 1–5 are published in Part 1 of this paper, in the March issue, Appl. Opt. 17, 673 (1978).
  2. See Ref. 1, Fig. 78.
  3. See Ref. 1, p. 101.

1978 (1)

Appl. Opt. (1)

Other (2)

See Ref. 1, Fig. 78.

See Ref. 1, p. 101.

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Figures (2)

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Ray traced reflector curve: two points only are shown, to illustrate the method. Each successive point is located by trial and error until tangents intersect on bisectors between αn and αn+1 (or between βn and βn+1). f2 lies on a caustic curve generated by the family of reflected rays.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Red–green diagram.

Equations (4)

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ln ( r / f ) = tan α β 2 d α ,
ln ( r / f ) = tan α α 3 2 d α = tan α 3 d α .
ln ( r / f ) = 3 ln cos ( α / 3 )
r = f / [ cos ( α / 3 ) ] 3 .

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