Abstract

A new type of hologram that combines computer-generated holograms with volume holograms is described. This hologram allows arbitrary selection of the location and color of a computer-generated image when white light illumination is used. Potential applications include optical information processing, holographic optical elements, multicolor displays, and lens testing. Calculations are made to determine the range of wavelengths possible for image reconstruction. Experimental results are given and discussed.

© 1978 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

  • View by:
  • |
  • |
  • |

  1. B. R. Brown, A. W. Lohmann, Appl. Opt. 5, 967 (1966).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. A. W. Lohmann, D. P. Paris, Appl. Opt. 6, 1739 (1967).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. H. Kogelnik, Bell Syst. Tech. J. 48, 2909 (1969).
  4. R. J. Collier, C. B. Burckhardt, L. H. Lin, Optical Holography (Academic, New York, 1971), Chap. 9.
  5. D. R. MacQuigg [Appl. Opt. 16, 1380 (1977)] has demonstrated a technique for recording computer-generated wavefronts into a volume transmission hologram.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. The wavelength of diffracted light depends on the incidence angle, fringe tilt, and fringe spacing, but it is assumed that the incidence angle and fringe tilt are chosen first so that specifying the fringe spacing will then determine the diffracted wavelength.
  7. M. Lehmann, Holography (Focal Press, New York, 1970), p. 72.
  8. Ref. 4, p. 288.
  9. H. W. Smith, Principles of Holography (Interscience, New York, 1969), p. 66.
  10. Ref. 4, p. 519.
  11. S. K. Case, “Multiple Exposure Holography in Volume Materials,” Thesis, University of Michigan (1976) (University Microfilms, Inc. order no. 76-27, 461), p. 94.
  12. S. Lowenthal, P. Chavel, Appl. Opt. 13, 718 (1974).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1977 (1)

1974 (1)

1969 (1)

H. Kogelnik, Bell Syst. Tech. J. 48, 2909 (1969).

1967 (1)

1966 (1)

Brown, B. R.

Burckhardt, C. B.

R. J. Collier, C. B. Burckhardt, L. H. Lin, Optical Holography (Academic, New York, 1971), Chap. 9.

Case, S. K.

S. K. Case, “Multiple Exposure Holography in Volume Materials,” Thesis, University of Michigan (1976) (University Microfilms, Inc. order no. 76-27, 461), p. 94.

Chavel, P.

Collier, R. J.

R. J. Collier, C. B. Burckhardt, L. H. Lin, Optical Holography (Academic, New York, 1971), Chap. 9.

Kogelnik, H.

H. Kogelnik, Bell Syst. Tech. J. 48, 2909 (1969).

Lehmann, M.

M. Lehmann, Holography (Focal Press, New York, 1970), p. 72.

Lin, L. H.

R. J. Collier, C. B. Burckhardt, L. H. Lin, Optical Holography (Academic, New York, 1971), Chap. 9.

Lohmann, A. W.

Lowenthal, S.

MacQuigg, D. R.

Paris, D. P.

Smith, H. W.

H. W. Smith, Principles of Holography (Interscience, New York, 1969), p. 66.

Appl. Opt. (4)

Bell Syst. Tech. J. (1)

H. Kogelnik, Bell Syst. Tech. J. 48, 2909 (1969).

Other (7)

R. J. Collier, C. B. Burckhardt, L. H. Lin, Optical Holography (Academic, New York, 1971), Chap. 9.

The wavelength of diffracted light depends on the incidence angle, fringe tilt, and fringe spacing, but it is assumed that the incidence angle and fringe tilt are chosen first so that specifying the fringe spacing will then determine the diffracted wavelength.

M. Lehmann, Holography (Focal Press, New York, 1970), p. 72.

Ref. 4, p. 288.

H. W. Smith, Principles of Holography (Interscience, New York, 1969), p. 66.

Ref. 4, p. 519.

S. K. Case, “Multiple Exposure Holography in Volume Materials,” Thesis, University of Michigan (1976) (University Microfilms, Inc. order no. 76-27, 461), p. 94.

Cited By

OSA participates in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. Citing articles from OSA journals and other participating publishers are listed here.

Alert me when this article is cited.


Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Construction geometry for a comport-generated volume hologram.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Readout of a CGVH.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Wavelength selection. Coherent recording beams (a) form a reflection grating that reads out in red (b). The same two recording beams symmetrically rotated to form a different recording geometry (c) construct a reflection grating with smaller grating spacing (d). Readout of this grating at the same incidence angle as in (b) produces a blue diffracted wave (d). The diffracted wavelength can be chosen independently from the diffraction angle.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Construction geometry for a reflection grating. All angles are measured inside the emulsion.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Diffracted wavelength vs construction parameters. The wavelength λ r is measured in free space. The grating construction angles θ1 and θ2 and the readout incidence angle θi are measured inside the emulsion. Wavelengths and angles shown are those that can be obtained without the use of prisms for construction and/or readout.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Monochrome image obtained from a CGVH.

Equations (8)

Equations on this page are rendered with MathJax. Learn more.

θ f = ( θ 1 + θ 2 ) / 2 .
2 d sin θ B construction = λ c ,
d = λ c 2 sin [ ( θ 2 θ 1 ) / 2 ] .
2 d sin θ B readout = λ r
θ B readout = θ f θ i = 1 2 ( θ 1 + θ 2 ) θ i .
λ r = λ c sin { [ ( θ 1 + θ 2 ) / 2 ] θ i } sin [ ( θ 2 θ 1 ) / 2 ] .
λ r = α λ c sin { [ ( θ 1 + θ 2 ) / 2 ] θ i } sin [ ( θ 2 θ 1 ) / 2 ] .
θ r = 2 θ f θ i = θ 1 + θ 2 θ i .

Metrics