Abstract

The widespread use of laser calorimetry for small absorption coefficient measurements implies that the procedure has reached a certain maturity. With several wavelengths available with significant power levels from different lasers, calorimetry can be considered as an extension of spectroscopy. In this sense, it becomes desirable to automate the calorimetric measurements. We describe the automated calorimeter built at Honeywell. Measurements can be made on bulk samples and on thin films deposited on substrates. Details of the experiment and computer control approach are given. This automated calorimeter has given us the capability to examine large numbers of samples and to determine the effects of various processing steps on bulk absorption.

© 1978 Optical Society of America

PDF Article

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription