Abstract

A solid state scan converter is described that converts a family of profiles derived from photogrammetrically processed stereo imagery into a family of orthogonally projected contours for the purpose of display, editing, planning, and data processing. Transformations of the display of profiles such as rotation and scaling are discussed along with a stereo version of the system suitable as an on-line verification system in which orthogonally projected contours are superimposed upon the original stereo photos from which the profiles were derived.

© 1976 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. M. M. Thompson, Ed., Manual of Photogrammetry (American Society of Photogrammetry, New York, 1966).
  2. U. V. Helava, W. E. Chapelle, “Epipolar-Scan Correlator,” Bendix Tech. J., 1 (Spring1972).
  3. T. J. Blachut, M. C. van Wijk, Photogramm. Eng. 36, 365 (1970).
  4. Z. Jaksic, in Proceedings, Man-Machine Interface in Photogrammetry, U. New Brunswick, Canada (7–9 August 1972), p. 23; Can. Surv. 27, 308 (1973).
  5. Intel CCD storage card CU-65, 1.2m bits.
  6. M. Brookes, Appl. Opt. 14, 1835 (1975).
  7. S. H. Collins, Photogramm. Eng. 38, 1195 (1972).

1975 (1)

1972 (2)

S. H. Collins, Photogramm. Eng. 38, 1195 (1972).

U. V. Helava, W. E. Chapelle, “Epipolar-Scan Correlator,” Bendix Tech. J., 1 (Spring1972).

1970 (1)

T. J. Blachut, M. C. van Wijk, Photogramm. Eng. 36, 365 (1970).

Blachut, T. J.

T. J. Blachut, M. C. van Wijk, Photogramm. Eng. 36, 365 (1970).

Brookes, M.

Chapelle, W. E.

U. V. Helava, W. E. Chapelle, “Epipolar-Scan Correlator,” Bendix Tech. J., 1 (Spring1972).

Collins, S. H.

S. H. Collins, Photogramm. Eng. 38, 1195 (1972).

Helava, U. V.

U. V. Helava, W. E. Chapelle, “Epipolar-Scan Correlator,” Bendix Tech. J., 1 (Spring1972).

Jaksic, Z.

Z. Jaksic, in Proceedings, Man-Machine Interface in Photogrammetry, U. New Brunswick, Canada (7–9 August 1972), p. 23; Can. Surv. 27, 308 (1973).

van Wijk, M. C.

T. J. Blachut, M. C. van Wijk, Photogramm. Eng. 36, 365 (1970).

Appl. Opt. (1)

Bendix Tech. J. (1)

U. V. Helava, W. E. Chapelle, “Epipolar-Scan Correlator,” Bendix Tech. J., 1 (Spring1972).

Photogramm. Eng. (2)

T. J. Blachut, M. C. van Wijk, Photogramm. Eng. 36, 365 (1970).

S. H. Collins, Photogramm. Eng. 38, 1195 (1972).

Other (3)

M. M. Thompson, Ed., Manual of Photogrammetry (American Society of Photogrammetry, New York, 1966).

Z. Jaksic, in Proceedings, Man-Machine Interface in Photogrammetry, U. New Brunswick, Canada (7–9 August 1972), p. 23; Can. Surv. 27, 308 (1973).

Intel CCD storage card CU-65, 1.2m bits.

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Figures (10)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Depiction of a space model of the terrain formed by a pair of oriented stereophotographs. The slit, centered at any given coordinate, bounds the terrain surface element to be transformed into the orthophoto and stereomate projections. O1 and O2 are centers of projection (at focal length f) of the stereopair, separated by base B and at height H above some reference plane in the model. The slit is at instantaneous height h from this reference plant.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Optical–mechanical assembly of a photogrammetric analytical stereoplotter.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Elements essential to generating terrain slope signals Δzx, Δzy for a profiling instrument. The profile to contour converter memory (Fig. 4) is loaded as shown in this smaller single profile memory. ↑, counters; ↕, up/down counters.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Diagram of stored profile (memory) to contour converter and display drives. N X-Z profiles, each M increments long, are stored in the memory and read out as shown. BRM are binary rate multipliers used as scalers; D/A, digital to analog converters; ↕, up/down counters; ↑, counters; A, linear voltage variable attenuator; a.g.c., automatic gain control unit; T, threshold device used to set contour segment line length. A circuit not shown increases contour segment line length when Δzx ≪ Δzy. Switch S open—profile output; closed—contour output.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Block diagram of incremental electronic polar to cartesian steering logic. ↕ are up/down counters; P/C is a polar to cartesian converter.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

A circuit to blank hidden lines in a profile raster advancing from the bottom of the display screen. ↕ is an up/down counter preset by Δy and requiring the Δzx increments from adjacent profiles. A profile is blanked whenever the counter becomes negative. The counts received are modified by a scaler programmed by cosθ as the display is oriented by θ.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Rotation in horizontal angle ϕ is performed on the analog YZ data by analog multiplier and summation circuits programmed from a sine-cosine potentiometer6 (↕ up/down counter).

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Zoom circuitry added to Fig. 4 starts the display sweeps at a preselected starting coordinate and changes the sweep rates according to the binary rate multiplier scaling unit programmed from the zoom rate input (↕ up/down counter).

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Perspective of a stereo related pair of profiles, one of a family showing their display position relative to stereo model coordinates.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Line drawing conception of on-line profiling verification. T1, T2 are stereo paired photographs mounted in a stereo instrument such as that of Fig. 2 and analytically oriented. D1, D2 are twin displays of photo scale contours from profiles derived from T1, T2, stored in memory, converted, displayed, and imaged at scale 1 to 1 upon T1, T2.

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