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  1. Effects of microstructure in ferroelectric crystals on the intensity and angular distribution of radiated second harmonic have been reported by R. C. Miller, Phys. Rev. 134, A1313 (1964); I. Freund, Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1288 (1967); Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 1404 (1968); and by I. Freund, L. Hopf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 24, 1017 (1970). However, we know of no previous observations of images of microstructure formed from the radiated second harmonic.
    [Crossref]
  2. A preliminary account of this work was given at the VIII International Conference on Quantum Electronics, San Francisco, California, 10 June 1974, Abstract C9.
  3. Robert Hellwarth, Paul Christensen, Optics Communications 12, 318 (1974).
    [Crossref]

1974 (1)

Robert Hellwarth, Paul Christensen, Optics Communications 12, 318 (1974).
[Crossref]

1964 (1)

Effects of microstructure in ferroelectric crystals on the intensity and angular distribution of radiated second harmonic have been reported by R. C. Miller, Phys. Rev. 134, A1313 (1964); I. Freund, Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1288 (1967); Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 1404 (1968); and by I. Freund, L. Hopf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 24, 1017 (1970). However, we know of no previous observations of images of microstructure formed from the radiated second harmonic.
[Crossref]

Christensen, Paul

Robert Hellwarth, Paul Christensen, Optics Communications 12, 318 (1974).
[Crossref]

Hellwarth, Robert

Robert Hellwarth, Paul Christensen, Optics Communications 12, 318 (1974).
[Crossref]

Miller, R. C.

Effects of microstructure in ferroelectric crystals on the intensity and angular distribution of radiated second harmonic have been reported by R. C. Miller, Phys. Rev. 134, A1313 (1964); I. Freund, Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1288 (1967); Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 1404 (1968); and by I. Freund, L. Hopf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 24, 1017 (1970). However, we know of no previous observations of images of microstructure formed from the radiated second harmonic.
[Crossref]

Optics Communications (1)

Robert Hellwarth, Paul Christensen, Optics Communications 12, 318 (1974).
[Crossref]

Phys. Rev. (1)

Effects of microstructure in ferroelectric crystals on the intensity and angular distribution of radiated second harmonic have been reported by R. C. Miller, Phys. Rev. 134, A1313 (1964); I. Freund, Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1288 (1967); Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 1404 (1968); and by I. Freund, L. Hopf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 24, 1017 (1970). However, we know of no previous observations of images of microstructure formed from the radiated second harmonic.
[Crossref]

Other (1)

A preliminary account of this work was given at the VIII International Conference on Quantum Electronics, San Francisco, California, 10 June 1974, Abstract C9.

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Figures (2)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Schematic of second-harmonic microscope. The illuminating laser was a Korad cw repetitively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser giving 103 pps, each of order 10−4 J and 200-nsec duration. The unpolarized output could be polarized by a Glan prism G and was focused by lens L onto the sample S, without causing damage. The viewing microscope M could be tilted at any angle to the incident beam and contained an ir rejection filter F plus an optional polarizer P. The farfield viewing screen FP was also used to see the angular distribution of second harmonic light.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Photomicrographs taken with Polaroid 107 film (ASA 3000). Exposure times were from 20 min to 1 h. (a) Second harmonic image of the interior of a polycrystalline ZnSe window. (b) Second harmonic image of inclusion inside a GaAs single crystal. (c) Scratches on the surface of a CdTe window as seen through an ordinary microscope. (d) Second harmonic image of the scratches in (c) viewed from opposite side. (e) Second harmonic image of 10-μm thick CdS film on a glass substrate. (f) Same film as in (e) as seen through an ordinary polarizing microscope.

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