Abstract

A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15–20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

© 1975 Optical Society of America

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Figures (12)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Schematic drawing of the hypervelocity range.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Range with accelerator and particle detector.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Coaxial accelerator with compressor coil.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Compressor coil configuration.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Photograph of eight-camera unit.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Schematic diagram of the camera. For S in figure read S1.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Color photograph of the conical coil flow.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Color photograph of the conical coil flow at maximum compression.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Color photograph of particles in plasma flow.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Straight coil configuration.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Photograph of coaxial accelerator with straight coil and conical body.

Fig. 12
Fig. 12

Color photograph of plasma flow around conical body.

Tables (3)

Tables Icon

Table I Camera Specifications

Tables Icon

Table II Controller Specifications

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Table III Filters for Dye-Color Transfer Technique

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