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Figures (10)

1
1

Pencil points to diamond saw blade. The mark on the glass delineates excess to be cut off.

2
2

Platten used to hold the work in place by vacuum is distributed to one side and floats on a cushion of compressed air blown out the other side. This gives a delicate feel to the sawing operation.

3
3

Excess stock is removed by a diamond band saw. In ½ h, over 100 h cam grinding is saved.

4
4

Excess glass in one continuous rim. Try this with your jack knife!

5
5

The hold down bar is shown in place. This secures the oval in case of vacuum failure.

6
6

Hold down bar removed. Note the ball thrust bearing with spherical seat. This allows downward pressure without twisting action.

7
7

The lower oval cam is affixed to the Blanchard chuck. The rotating follower—the same diameter as the diamond wheel—is attached to a rugged slide that can be moved in and out to provide feed. The upper work is held by vacuum and is ground by the diamond wheel shown in contact with it.

8
8

Looking down on glass and wheel. The water guard is in place and covers the cam and follower. The rotating cam causes table movement in and out. Linear roller bearings were installed under the chuck saddle.

9
9

The chuck is rotated about 2 rpm by vee belts around its outer skirt.

10
10

The edge polish is effected by a right angle head on a flexible belt. The disk is felt covered.

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