Abstract

After a few remarks about the beginnings of the Schneider company, its aims and its facilities, a few characteristic examples are given to explain the development of a number of Schneider lenses over a sixty-year period in the light of new knowledge and with the aid of new materials and new techniques and for new applications.

© 1974 Optical Society of America

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Figures (8)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Development of the Symmar lens. Upper: cross-section diagrams of the 135-mm objective. Middle: curves of spherical aberration, distortion, and astigmatism. Lower: resolving power vs field angle.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The 20-mm f/2 Cinegon. Backfocus 27 mm, field ±32°.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

The 18-mm f/1.8 Cinegon. Backfocus 22 mm, field ±37°.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

The 50-mm f/2 Xenon.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Spherical aberration and astigmatism curves of the Xenon lens showing 20 years of progress.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

The 10-40 mm f/2.8 Variogon zoom lens.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

The 6-66 mm f/1.8 Optivaron zoom lens.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

The 20-600 mm f/2.1 to f/6.3 TV Variogon zoom lens, shown at the shortest focal length and infinity setting.

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