Abstract

The resolution of a Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope is intrinsically superior to the resolution of the corresponding paraboloid–hyperboloid telescope. The improvement is important for high resolution and wide field telescope designs having grazing angles larger than about 1.5°.

© 1973 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 286 (1952).
    [CrossRef]
  2. H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 94 (1952).
    [CrossRef]
  3. L. P. VanSpeybroeck, R. C. Chase, Appl. Opt. 11, 440 (1972).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1972

1952

H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 286 (1952).
[CrossRef]

H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 94 (1952).
[CrossRef]

Chase, R. C.

VanSpeybroeck, L. P.

Wolter, H.

H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 286 (1952).
[CrossRef]

H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 94 (1952).
[CrossRef]

Ann. Phys.

H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 286 (1952).
[CrossRef]

H. Wolter, Ann. Phys. 10, 94 (1952).
[CrossRef]

Appl. Opt.

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

The rms blur circle radius of several Wolter-Schwarzschild surfaces as a function of the incident angle.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The difference between the rms blur circle radius of several paraboloid–hyperboloid telescopes and the rms blur circle radius of the corresponding Wolter-Schwarzschild surface, plotted as a function of the incident angle.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

The difference of a Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope and the corresponding paraboloid–hyperboloid telescope from the best fit circles to each surface. One fringe is equal to one-half wavelength of 5461-Å light.

Equations (16)

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r 1 = f sin β ,
Z 1 = - f sin 2 ( β * / 2 ) + r 1 2 / [ 4 f sin 2 ( β * / 2 ) ] + g cos 4 ( β / 2 ) { ( 1 / k ) tan 2 ( β / 2 ) - 1 } 1 - k .
r 2 = d sin β ,
Z 2 = d cos β ,
1 / d = [ ( 1 - cos β ) / ( 1 - cos β * ) ] + [ ( 1 + cos β ) / 2 g ] { ( 1 / k ) tan 2 ( β / 2 ) - 1 } 1 + k ,
k = tan 2 ( β * / 2 ) .
r p = f { [ 1 - sin 2 ( β * / 2 ) ] / [ 1 - sin 2 ( β / 2 ) ] } sin β ,
Z p = - ( p / 2 ) + ( r p 2 / 2 p ) . - [ 2 e f / ( e 2 - 1 ) ] ( 1 - e cos β * ) .
r h = d h sin β ,
Z h = d h cos β ,
1 / d h = ( 1 - e cos β ) / f ( e - cos β * ) ,
Z 0 = f cos β * = the distance from the axial ray focus to the intersection plane of the two surfaces ; this is essentially the focal length . α = 1 / 4 β * = 1 / 4 arctan ( r 0 / Z 0 ) , where r 0 is the radius of the surfaces at their intersection . The grazing angles for axial rays are approximately α for the typical design in which ξ = 1. ξ = f / g .
ξ α * parabola / α * hyperbola ,
σ D = 0.135 ( ξ + 1 ) ( tan 2 θ / tan α ) ( L 1 / Z 0 ) ,
2 α 2 ,             0 θ 3 0 , 0.05 L 1 / Z 0 0.2 ,             1 4 ξ 4 ,
δ = 0.0625 ( ξ + 1 ) ( r 2 L 1 / Z 0 2 ) ( 1 / tan α ) 2 .

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