Abstract

We have developed and successfully used an integrating two-dimensional silicon diode array vidicon photometer which is exceptionally well suited for use with telescopes. The video signal is read out from the 1-cm2 silicon target of the vidicon through a current mode preamplifier and then converted to digital form and stored on magnetic tape. The 256 × 256 element frames are recorded at 20,000 eight-bit words/sec. The vidicon tube has a published quantum efficiency ranging from 85% at 0.5 μ to 6% at 1.1 μ and must be cooled to about –65°C to eliminate thermal dark current. The minimum detectable signal in the present system is about 1000 carriers per resolution element, limited by preamplifier and other system noise. The system is used as a single-frame camera. The large dynamic range (>103), linear response, high quantum efficiency over a large spectral region, and low cost of the system make it well suited for digital direct image and spectroscopy as well as for a laboratory digitizer of two-dimensional material.

© 1972 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. L. M. Biberman, S. Nudelman, Eds., Photoelectronic Imaging Devices (Plenum, New York, 1971).
    [CrossRef]
  2. J. A. Westphal, T. B. McCord, “A Silicon Vidicon Photometer,” presented at the Symposium, Advanced Electronic Systems for Astronomy, Santa Cruz (31 August–2 September 1971). Proceedings to appear in Publ. Astron. Soc. Pacific.
  3. M. H. Crowell, E. F. Labuda, in Photoelectronic Imaging Devices, L. M. Biberman, S. Nudelman, Eds. (PlenumNew York, 1971), Vol. 2.

Crowell, M. H.

M. H. Crowell, E. F. Labuda, in Photoelectronic Imaging Devices, L. M. Biberman, S. Nudelman, Eds. (PlenumNew York, 1971), Vol. 2.

Labuda, E. F.

M. H. Crowell, E. F. Labuda, in Photoelectronic Imaging Devices, L. M. Biberman, S. Nudelman, Eds. (PlenumNew York, 1971), Vol. 2.

McCord, T. B.

J. A. Westphal, T. B. McCord, “A Silicon Vidicon Photometer,” presented at the Symposium, Advanced Electronic Systems for Astronomy, Santa Cruz (31 August–2 September 1971). Proceedings to appear in Publ. Astron. Soc. Pacific.

Westphal, J. A.

J. A. Westphal, T. B. McCord, “A Silicon Vidicon Photometer,” presented at the Symposium, Advanced Electronic Systems for Astronomy, Santa Cruz (31 August–2 September 1971). Proceedings to appear in Publ. Astron. Soc. Pacific.

Other (3)

L. M. Biberman, S. Nudelman, Eds., Photoelectronic Imaging Devices (Plenum, New York, 1971).
[CrossRef]

J. A. Westphal, T. B. McCord, “A Silicon Vidicon Photometer,” presented at the Symposium, Advanced Electronic Systems for Astronomy, Santa Cruz (31 August–2 September 1971). Proceedings to appear in Publ. Astron. Soc. Pacific.

M. H. Crowell, E. F. Labuda, in Photoelectronic Imaging Devices, L. M. Biberman, S. Nudelman, Eds. (PlenumNew York, 1971), Vol. 2.

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

The entire system is shown schematically.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The target of the vidicon is shown idealized. Photons incident produce charge pairs. The hole diffuses across the nearest back-biased diode and discharges the diode capacitance. The electron read beam replaces the charge on the diode, creating a current flow in the video circuit. The target thickness can be increased for greater ir sensitivity at the expense of lower spatial resolution due to lateral diffusion of charges.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

The published spectral response of the commercial grade RCA silicon vidicon including the effects of an antireflection coating peaked for maximum transmission at about 0.5 μm.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

The smoothed square wave response function for the silicon vidicon as given by RCA.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Intensity contours of an image of Jupiter made through a 300-Å wide interference filter centered at 0.40 μm. These are raw data unprocessed for noise or target sensitivity. The small intense areas near Jupiter’s west limb are due to defective diodes on the target. Larger numbers = lighter areas. The solar phase angle is about 12° so the eastern terminator is not visible. The Great Red Spot appears as a very dark area in the southeast quadrant. Note the intense uv bright spots near the GRS. The contours near the limb have been omitted except for the last one. This image and that in Fig. 6 were made using the 152-cm telescope of the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Chile.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Intensity contours of a 1-min unfiltered exposure of the central 100 sec of arc region of the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae. The faintest stars contoured are about eighteenth magnitude.

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