Abstract

The persons and the methods they employed for designing Kodak camera lenses are recalled, from the earliest, almost symmetrical four-element air spaced lenses, designed by hand, through the large lenses made for aerial cameras during World War II and the introduction of rare-earth glasses and then plastics, to very high resolution modern lenses for microfilm cameras and high quality zoom lenses for Super-8-mm motion picture equipment, designed almost completely automatically by electronic computers. The most modern and powerful methods of evaluating optical-image quality, including the role of the human eye, and the use of those methods for lens design and system and production engineering are described.

© 1972 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
Related Articles
Automatic Optical Design

Donald P. Feder
Appl. Opt. 2(12) 1209-1226 (1963)

Optical Materials Research

W. F. Parsons
Appl. Opt. 11(1) 43-49 (1972)

Design and use of mass-produced aspheres at Kodak

Paul L. Ruben
Appl. Opt. 24(11) 1682-1688 (1985)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription