Abstract

Advances in multilayer interference filter technology have enabled the development of filter grating spectrophotometers out to 250 cm−1 (40 μ). Properties of the filters are described. Factors which determine the rejection and transmission requirements for the filters are discussed and special design problems in filter grating systems are elaborated. Unwanted radiation measurements in the resulting system are reported. The features of filter grating spectrophotometers compared to foreprism grating instruments are listed.

© 1962 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. R. C. Lord, T. K. McCubbin, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 45, 441 (1955).
    [Crossref]
  2. R. C. Lord, T. K. McCubbin, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 47, 689 (1957).
    [Crossref]
  3. L. I. Epstein, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 42, 806 (1952).
    [Crossref]
  4. H. W. Marshall, “Efficiencies for Infrared Gratings,” Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy Symposium, Ohio State University (1961).

1957 (1)

1955 (1)

1952 (1)

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (3)

Other (1)

H. W. Marshall, “Efficiencies for Infrared Gratings,” Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy Symposium, Ohio State University (1961).

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Transmit tance curve of a long-wave pass interference filter.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Efficiency measurements made in the first three orders of a 100 l/mm grating blazed at 22°7, using unpolarized incident radiation.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Schematic diagram of double cosecant arm mechanism.

Equations (2)

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E n E 1 = 1 n · ( λ 1 λ n ) 4 = n 3 for λ > ~ 5 μ .
d θ d λ = 2 tan θ λ .

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