Abstract

A new arrangement for a high-speed rotating-mirror framing camera using mirror strips instead of lens strips as framing stops is described. The design is especially simple when a few frames close together in time are required. A camera which takes 14 frames resolving about 150 line pairs across the frame at a rate of 10,000,000 frames per second, or 14 frames resolving 250 line pairs at a rate of 5,000,000 frames per second is also described. The effective exposure time is 80% of the time between frames, and the camera operates at effective aperture of f/20.

© 1962 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. Bibliography on High-Speed Photography, through December1955, compiled by Elsie L. Garvin, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, available from the company.
  2. B. Brixner, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 45, 876 (1955).
    [CrossRef]
  3. T. E. Holland, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory reports, 1950 to 1952.
  4. T. E. Holland, W. C. Davis, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 48, 365 (1958).
    [CrossRef]

1958 (1)

1955 (1)

Brixner, B.

Davis, W. C.

Garvin, Elsie L.

Bibliography on High-Speed Photography, through December1955, compiled by Elsie L. Garvin, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, available from the company.

Holland, T. E.

T. E. Holland, W. C. Davis, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 48, 365 (1958).
[CrossRef]

T. E. Holland, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory reports, 1950 to 1952.

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (2)

Other (2)

Bibliography on High-Speed Photography, through December1955, compiled by Elsie L. Garvin, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, available from the company.

T. E. Holland, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory reports, 1950 to 1952.

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Optical diagram of the camera.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Photograph of an example of the camera: (1) position of real image; (2) L1; (3) framing aperture; (4) L2; (5) rotating mirror; (6) L3; (7) framing mirrors; (8) lens board for L4; (9) film track.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Framing camera photograph of an explosion in Dithekite 13. The detonation propagates up to the glass tube at bottom center, and then expands irregularly as it enters a box full of the explosive. The shock wave from the glass tube moving out into the box of liquid explosive can be seen, with the superimposed grid lines distorted by refraction. The silhouette back-light is so bright that the light of detonation seems dim. The still picture at bottom right shows a millimeter scale, removed before firing. The framing time is 0.25 μsec, and the exposure time 0.20 μsec.

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