Abstract

The effects of a plastic objective lens’s astigmatism on the push–pull tracking-error signal (TES) of an optical disk data storage system were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Astigmatism of plastic objective lenses arises commonly from the asymmetric deviation from their designed shape during the molding process. By carefully studying the aberration characteristics of the objective lens and including the astigmatism of the laser diode in the analysis, we can calculate the combined effects of astigmatism of these two components on the push–pull TES. It is found, from both the simulations and the experiments, that, by rotation of the objective lens about the optical axis, the peak-to-peak value of the push–pull TES varies with the lens’s rotation angle, and a change as great as 340% in its value was observed in a given optical pickup.

© 2000 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

  • View by:
  • |
  • |
  • |

  1. J. Braat, “Read-out of optical discs,” in Principles of Optical Disc Systems, G. Bouwhuis, J. Braat, A. Huijser, J. Pasman, G. van Rosmalen, K. Schouhamer Immink, eds. (Hilger, Boston, 1985), pp. 20–23.
  2. C. L. Bartlett, D. Kay, M. Mansuripur, “Computer simulations of effects of disk tilt and lens tilt on push–pull tracking error signal in an optical drive,” Appl. Opt. 36, 8467–8473 (1997).
    [CrossRef]
  3. R. E. Gerber, T. S. Gardner, D. B. Kay, “Problem of track offset in optical disk systems,” Appl. Opt. 37, 8173–8180 (1998).
    [CrossRef]
  4. R. E. Gerber, M. Mansuripur, “Tilt correction in an optical disk system,” Appl. Opt. 35, 7000–7007 (1996).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. M. Mansuripur, The Physical Principles of Magneto-Optical Recording (Cambridge U. Press, New York, 1995), Chap. 8, pp. 275–276.
  6. M. Mansuripur, “Certain computational aspects of vector diffraction problems,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 6, 786–805 (1989).
    [CrossRef]
  7. U. Greis, G. Kirchhoff, “Injection molding of plastic optics,” in Optical Surface Technology, H. Walter, ed., Proc. SPIE381, 69–76 (1983).
    [CrossRef]
  8. H. Kawai, M. Suzuki, A. Yoshida, “Birefringence-free acrylic resin for precision plastic optics,” in Precision Plastic Optics for Optical Storage, Displays, Imaging, and Communications, F. W. Frank, ed., Proc. SPIE3135, 42–51 (1997).
    [CrossRef]

1998 (1)

1997 (1)

1996 (1)

1989 (1)

Bartlett, C. L.

Braat, J.

J. Braat, “Read-out of optical discs,” in Principles of Optical Disc Systems, G. Bouwhuis, J. Braat, A. Huijser, J. Pasman, G. van Rosmalen, K. Schouhamer Immink, eds. (Hilger, Boston, 1985), pp. 20–23.

Gardner, T. S.

Gerber, R. E.

Greis, U.

U. Greis, G. Kirchhoff, “Injection molding of plastic optics,” in Optical Surface Technology, H. Walter, ed., Proc. SPIE381, 69–76 (1983).
[CrossRef]

Kawai, H.

H. Kawai, M. Suzuki, A. Yoshida, “Birefringence-free acrylic resin for precision plastic optics,” in Precision Plastic Optics for Optical Storage, Displays, Imaging, and Communications, F. W. Frank, ed., Proc. SPIE3135, 42–51 (1997).
[CrossRef]

Kay, D.

Kay, D. B.

Kirchhoff, G.

U. Greis, G. Kirchhoff, “Injection molding of plastic optics,” in Optical Surface Technology, H. Walter, ed., Proc. SPIE381, 69–76 (1983).
[CrossRef]

Mansuripur, M.

Suzuki, M.

H. Kawai, M. Suzuki, A. Yoshida, “Birefringence-free acrylic resin for precision plastic optics,” in Precision Plastic Optics for Optical Storage, Displays, Imaging, and Communications, F. W. Frank, ed., Proc. SPIE3135, 42–51 (1997).
[CrossRef]

Yoshida, A.

H. Kawai, M. Suzuki, A. Yoshida, “Birefringence-free acrylic resin for precision plastic optics,” in Precision Plastic Optics for Optical Storage, Displays, Imaging, and Communications, F. W. Frank, ed., Proc. SPIE3135, 42–51 (1997).
[CrossRef]

Appl. Opt. (3)

J. Opt. Soc. Am. A (1)

Other (4)

U. Greis, G. Kirchhoff, “Injection molding of plastic optics,” in Optical Surface Technology, H. Walter, ed., Proc. SPIE381, 69–76 (1983).
[CrossRef]

H. Kawai, M. Suzuki, A. Yoshida, “Birefringence-free acrylic resin for precision plastic optics,” in Precision Plastic Optics for Optical Storage, Displays, Imaging, and Communications, F. W. Frank, ed., Proc. SPIE3135, 42–51 (1997).
[CrossRef]

J. Braat, “Read-out of optical discs,” in Principles of Optical Disc Systems, G. Bouwhuis, J. Braat, A. Huijser, J. Pasman, G. van Rosmalen, K. Schouhamer Immink, eds. (Hilger, Boston, 1985), pp. 20–23.

M. Mansuripur, The Physical Principles of Magneto-Optical Recording (Cambridge U. Press, New York, 1995), Chap. 8, pp. 275–276.

Cited By

OSA participates in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. Citing articles from OSA journals and other participating publishers are listed here.

Alert me when this article is cited.


Figures (11)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Irradiance distribution at the pupil of the objective lens. The difference in intensity received by the two halves of the split detector gives rise to a TES.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of an optical readout system with push–pull tracking mechanism.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Irradiance distribution observed (a) after the aperture, (b) at the disk, and (c) at the exit pupil of the objective lens.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Irradiance distribution observed (a) at the disk for ϕ22 = 45°, (b) at the exit pupil of the lens for ϕ22 = 45°, (c) at the disk for ϕ22 = -45°, and (d) at the exit pupil of the lens for ϕ22 = -45°.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Variation of the TES by changing the values of ϕ22 with the parameters listed in Table 1. The solid curve is obtained when C 22 is set to 0.04λ rms, and the dotted curve is calculated when C 22 is set to 0.02λ rms.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Schematic drawing of an actuator that allows for the objective lens to be rotated.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Coordinate system that defines the rotation direction of the objective lens.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Isometric view of the transmitted wave-front aberration of the objective lens measured by a Twyman–Green interferometer.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Astigmatism contour of the objective lens by rotation of the lens. The rotation angles are measured with an accuracy of ±1°.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Variation of the PP values of the TES by rotation of the objective lens. The dots are the experimental results, and the solid curve is the simulation result obtained by use of the results shown in Fig. 9.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

(a) Astigmatism contour of a less astigmatic lens, (b) the corresponding variation of the PP values of the TES when the lens is rotated.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Parameters of Simulated Compact Disc Storage System

Equations (1)

Equations on this page are rendered with MathJax. Learn more.

W22ρ, θ=C22ρ2 cos2ϕ-ϕ22,

Metrics