Abstract

We show that an artificially grown diamond plate with an improved surface flatness serves as an infrared beam splitter to wavelengths as short as 2.2 µm (4500 cm-1).

© 1999 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. J. C. Brasunas, G. M. Cushman, B. Lakew, “Artificial diamond as a broadband infrared beam splitter for Fourier transform spectroscopy,” Appl. Opt. 37, 4226–4229 (1998).
    [CrossRef]
  2. Harris Diamond Corporation, 100 Stierli Court, Suite 106, Mount Arlington, N.J. 07856.

1998 (1)

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Interferogram response to a 1200-K source with using the improved polish diamond window, without a compensator.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Mean (thick curve) and standard deviation (thin curve) of five spectra for scans similar to Fig. 1.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Transmission of air path (thin curve) and diamond (thick curve) for the spectral range germane to the interpretation of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Comparison of the mean observed spectrum (thin curve) with a model calculation (thick curve).

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