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References

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  1. V. G. Nikolashin, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 656 (1971).
  2. J. B. Houston, C. J. Buccini, P. K. O’Neill, Appl. Opt. 6, 1237(1967).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1971

V. G. Nikolashin, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 656 (1971).

1967

Appl. Opt.

J. Opt. Soc. Am.

V. G. Nikolashin, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 656 (1971).

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

(a) Spectrum with no signal applied. The intensity of the lines was inverted from time to time, but this did not seem to be a function of the driving frequency. (b) Spectrum during a period of transition when the line to the right of the primary line was slowly decreasing in amplitude as the one on the left increased. During this transition, all three lines were highly unstable, but as with the amplitude inversion, the phenomenon seemed to be independent of driving frequency. (c) and (d) Spectrum at 2.375 kHz; instability was most severe in this region. Horizontal scale is 20 MHz per division.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The spectrum expanded 5X. (a) is the unperturbed spectrum at 10 kHz, (b) through (f) are the same spectrum at a driving frequency of 2.39 kHz, the elapsed time between successive exposures being approximately 3–5 sec. Horizontal scale is 4 MHz/division.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Fringe contrast change stopped in progress by a high shutter speed.

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