Abstract

The advent of laser-diode pumped erbium-doped fiber amplifiers operating in the 1.5 µm band has led to rapid progress being made on high speed optical communication in the GHz region.1 In order to increase further the information capacity in an intensity-modulation/direct detection scheme, a high speed intensity modulator is indispensable. Although Lithium Niobate (LN) Mach-Zehnder type modulators have been commonly used in transmission experiments,2 interest has recently focused on the ElectroAbsorption (EA) modulator as it has a very wide band with a lower driving voltage than a conventional LN modulator.3,4 Another advantage of this device is that it can be used to generate transform-limited sech or Gaussian pulses simply by applying sinusoidal voltage modulations at different bias voltages.5 Such pulses were applied to soliton transmission as a simple soliton source and successful operation was reported.6

© 1993 Optical Society of America

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References

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