Abstract

1. Introduction. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) due to its principle where only laser photons are sent to the target and photons emitted by the plasma are detected can allow direct and in situ measurements of numerous elements in complex materials. LIBS has been applied for experiments on liquids [1] and different materials [2] but the use of an echelle spectrometer in the different experimental set-up is rather sparse [3, 4, 5]. The subject of this paper is to show the high potentiality of a commercial echelle spectrometer for multielemental analysis by LIBS and to compare detection limits obtained with such system and with a standard Czerny Turner spectrometer.

© 2002 Optical Society of America

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