Abstract

Pulsed laser deposition of thin films is often necessarily performed in the presence of background gases, for example, in situ deposition of 1:2:3 high- Tc superconductor films in ~200-mTorr oxygen. Ablated atoms and ions with typical initial kinetic energies of 40–70 eV undergo thermalization following collisions with the background gas, resulting in incident kinetic energies at the film surface of ~0.01 eV. The transport process involves the expansion of a high pressure beam of vaporized products through the background gas, which can lead to shock wave phenomena. An understanding of the complex hydrodynamic processes responsible for the attenuation and slowing of the pulse of ablated products is essential for the characterization of the pulsed laser deposition process.

© 1992 Optical Society of America

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