Abstract

Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) is forbidden in the bulk of centrosymmetric media but necessarily allowed at the surface. The process has been used as a versatile tool for surface studies on a wide variety of interfaces. It is rather sensitive, capable of detecting submonolayers of molecules on surfaces with relatively low laser powers.1 Normally, pulsed laser systems are used as the pump source. It can be shown, however, that the maximum surface SH signal generated by a cw laser from most materials, assuming that the incident intensity is limited by thermal damage, may be larger or comparable with that generated by a typical pulsed laser, if the beam area is <10−5 cm2. With focusing, surface SHG can have a spatial resolution limited in principle by the optical wavelength. Thus it is ideally suited for surface optical microscopy.

© 1986 Optical Society of America

PDF Article
More Like This
Studies of surface dynamics by optical second harmonic generation

T. F. HEINZ, G. ARJAVALINGAM, MICHAEL M. T. LOY, and J. H. GLOWNIA
THII1 International Quantum Electronics Conference (IQEC) 1986

Can Optical Second Harmonic Generation be Used as a Surface Probe for Non-centrosymmetric Media

T. Stehlin, M. Feller, P. Guyot-Sionnest, and Y. R. Shen
ThA2 International Quantum Electronics Conference (IQEC) 1988

Probing polymerization of Langmoir-Blodgett monomolecular layers by surface second harmonic generation

GONG-DA YU, GANG CHEN, LE LI, and ZHI-MING ZHANG
WT3 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) 1988

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription